Jun 132015
 

Until the roads come: traditional transport

Until the roads come: traditional transport

Highways, bridges, tunnels – all are crucial to Nepal’s economic growth and development. That’s the government view and that of major donors like the World Bank. Indeed, it’s going to transform the country in many ways – once it happens – and you might miss the quiet of the past. But it’s hard to argue with: few countries have achieved strong economic growth and development without fairly good infrastructure. As illustrated here with excerpts from an article in World Highways, common arguments go like this:

“Nepal’s road network is growing but there is an enormous need for more investment. A study in 2007 revealed that the country had 10,142 km in all of surfaced roads and a further 7,140 km of unsurfaced roads. Nepal has 75 District Headquarters and up to 15 have no direct connection by road, while 33% of the population live at least two hours walk from a road, presenting a major challenge to economic growth as well as for other factors such as education or health… Because Nepal is landlocked, it relies on its transport links with China and India for trade and the nearest port is in Kolkata (Calcutta). But there is only one dependable road link between the Kathmandu Valley and India at present and the development of a new route will bring enormous economic benefits.”

So, what are the plans for highways, bridges and tunnels? Well, here’s the article with latest details…

“Nepal has 75 District Headquarters and up to 15 have no direct connection by road, while 33% of the population live at least two hours walk from a road…” In World Highways

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