May 082017
 

On April 20, the local election was split into two phases: May 14 (1st phase) and June 14 (2nd phase)

It’s a virtual cliffhanger to follow the drama in the run-up to the local election. The election was recently split into two phases – May 14 and June 14, as opposed to just May 14 – and now the second phase may be in the balance.

For reasons never made quite clear to the public, the newly formed six-party Madheshi coalition, Rastriya Janata Party Nepal (RJPN), continues to reiterate a Madheshi demand for more local government units in their districts.

Madheshi leaders demand more local government units to be added in their districts

On March 8 the government partially met this Madheshi demand. It adjusted the decision of the Local Bodies Restructuring Commission (LBRC) upwards – from 719 local units to 744 – in order to grant more local units (Village Council divisions) to the Madheshi districts.

But the Madheshi coalition was still not content. They demanded more local government units in their districts. The UML made strong objections and yet, on April 28 the government granted the RJNP another 11 local units.

The LBRC defined the number of local units in its report of January 6 (picture) but it was changed to satisfy Madheshi demands

The UML objected as the LBRC was the body mandated to determine the number of local government units. The LBRC submitted its final decision – 719 local units in total – in January after much political interference already.

The government seemed to argue, on its part, that unless giving at least partially in to this Madheshi demand, the Madheshi coalition would boycot the local election and likely even try to obstruct the election in their districts.

The two-phase local election allows time to debate and satisfy Madheshi demands and avoid another Madhesi protest (picture)

But adding local units alone is not enough to appease the Madheshis. Their further demand – amidst UML protest – is that the government has a constitutional amendment in favor of Madheshi interests approved in parliament.

Indeed, on April 20 the local election was split into two phases – the election in the Madheshi districts to be held only on June 14 – after a government decision made to allow more time to debate and satisfy Madheshi demands.

After impeachment of Karki and RPP’s exit: can the government have Madheshi amendment passed in parliament?

Last week, the cliffhanger of the June 14 local election got worse. The RPP decided to leave the coalition government in protest against an impeachment of Chief Justice, Sushila Karki, issued by Maoist and NC government leaders.

Without the RPP onboard, the Maoist-NC government may now face great difficulties in securing a majority in parliament needed to approve the Madheshi constitutional amendments, if indeed it goes ahead and tries.

Will the Madheshi demands be met before the second phase of the local election on June 14? Will the Madheshi coalition participate in the local election even if their demands, including the constitutional amendment, are not met? The answers to these questions – hence the fate of the two-phase local election – remain uncertain.

Jan 162015
 

Chief Election Commissioner, N. K. Uprety: Ready if the parties want the local election...

Chief Election Commissioner, N. K. Uprety: Ready if the parties want the local election…

It has not really mattered who formed the government, or who was prime minister. Since 2002, when local elections were first due – five years after the 1997 election for the country’s DDCs, VDCs and municipalities – local elections have been postponed as persistently as has the finalisation of the constitution. Official reason? Anything from king Gyenendra’s take-over and the Maoist conflict to growing local corruption and a need to adopt the constitution first. The Election Commission has declared itself ready to organise the election many times. But every time, the government has postponed. Want to recount the recent chapters in this “never ending story”? Check out this overview!

Nepal will hold local elections in January 2015 after a gap of 16 years, Deputy Prime Minister Bam Dev Gautam said on Tuesday.” July 15, 2014